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Sunday, January 5, 2014

Carolina Gold

Book Description:

The war is over, but at Fairhaven Plantation, Charlotte's struggle has just begun. Following her father’s death, Charlotte Fraser returns to Fairhaven, her family’s rice plantation in the South Carolina Lowcountry.

With no one else to rely upon, smart, independent Charlotte is determined to resume cultivating the superior strain of rice called Carolina Gold. But the war has left the plantation in ruins, her father’s former bondsmen are free, and workers and equipment are in short supply.

To make ends meet, Charlotte reluctantly agrees to tutor the two young daughters of her widowed neighbor and heir to Willowood Plantation, Nicholas Betancourt. Just as her friendship with Nick deepens, he embarks upon a quest to prove his claim to Willowood and sends Charlotte on a dangerous journey that uncovers a long-held family secret, and threatens everything she holds dear.

Inspired by the life of a 19th-century woman rice farmer, Carolina Gold pays tribute to the hauntingly beautiful Lowcountry and weaves together mystery, romance, and historical detail, bringing to life the story of one young woman’s struggle to restore her ruined world.


Cafe Lily's Review:

Fans of historical fiction about the civil war, and the reconstruction period will enjoy this story of a determined young woman, trying to save her family home. Although romance does have its place in this story, it does not overshadow the struggles Charlotte faces in trying to put her life back together.  With a little mystery and suspense thrown in, this story has several facets for readers to enjoy.

Charlotte is spunky, independent, and smart and that easily endears her character to readers. She takes on the task of planting rice crops, which she knows very little about.  I enjoyed learning more about this time period, especially since the book was based on the life of Elizabeth Waties Allston Pringle.



 

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